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US-10
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M-11
Southern Terminus:   Downtown Detroit at jct M-3 & BS I-375 (cnr Jefferson Ave & Randolph St)
Northern Terminus:    Orchard Lake Rd just north of 14 Mile Rd in West Bloomfield Twp
Length: 22.88 miles
Map: Route Map of M-10
Notes: The freeway portion of M-10 in Detroit and Southfield is officially known as the John C. Lodge Freeway, however several of the route's former names are still used by some. The actual "John C. Lodge Expwy" originally only ran from Downtown Detroit out to the "Linwood Curve," halfway between the Davison and Wyoming Ave. A surface roadway—Northwestern Hwy—traditionally ran from Wyoming Ave northwesterly out of the city and into Oakland Co. When the freeway was extended in the early 1960s, the portion from the "Linwood Curve" west through the "Wyoming Curve," then northwesterly along the path of Northwestern Hwy to 8 Mile Rd was named "James Couzens Expwy." As the freeway was extended from 8 Mile Rd to Telegraph along Northwestern Hwy, the new freeway retained the name "Northwestern Hwy." It wasn't until the 1980s that MDOT decided to—officially or unofficially—rename the entire freeway the "John C. Lodge Frwy" from downtown Detroit to Telegraph Rd. Ironically, though, the service drives along M-10/John C. Lodge Frwy still retain their original names (as service drives, anyway). From downtown to Wyoming Ave, the service drives are named "John C. Lodge," from Wyoming to 8 Mile, the service drives as" James Couzens," and from 8 Mile to Telegraph, they're known as "Northwestern Hwy."
  As much as the freeway portion of today's M-10 has changed names over the years, the non-freeway divided highway portion has always been named "Northwestern Hwy." In addition, a Northwestern Hwy extension was proposed to connect the current end of Northwestern at Orchard Lake Rd in West Bloomfield Twp with the proposed "Fenton-Clio Expressway" at Fenton. (The "F.C.E." is today's US-23 in Genesee Co.). The dashed line showing the proposed Northwestern Extension appeared on maps for many years, disappearing in the early 1970s. When I-275 was proposed as a complete bypass of Metropolitan Detroit, the Northwestern Hwy extension was resurrected as a full-freeway connection between Orchard Lake Rd and the I-275 freeway between 15 Mile (Maple) Rd and Pontiac Tr near Walled Lake. With the tabling and abandonment of the plans to complete I-275, the Northwestern Extension has been on and off for many years. In the late-1990s and early '00s, MDOT hired a consultant to study the possibilities for the "Northwestern Corridor," mostly at the behest of the Road Commission for Oakland County. (See below.) However, as the land in the path of the original "Northwestern Extension" has been sold off for development, the originally-proposed freeway connection has been relegated to the history books.
  Updated The "Northwestern Connector Study" in Oakland County was conducted in the 2000s by consultants DLZ Corp. The preferred alternative included widening Orchard Lake Rd from a five-lane road into a six-lane boulevard, widening Maple (15 Mile) Rd into a four-lane boulevard, widening 14 Mile Rd into three-lanes, and placing eleven roundabouts on each of the above roads to replace signalized intersections! While the widening portions of the plan may help reduce congestion some, it remains to be seen if the citizens of Oakland Co will be able to handle eleven roundabouts—especially ones on a six-lane boulevard!
  According to The Detroit News' Tom Greenwood in his column on April 27, 2000, the portion of the M-10/Lodge Frwy in Southfield named the Adler Memorial Highway was named in honor of Rabbi Morris Adler who died after being shot by a deranged gunman in front of his congregation at Temple Shaarey Zedek on March 11, 1966.
  Updated The freeway portion of today's M-10 actually had no route designation when the first portion of the John C Lodge Expwy opened to traffic in the 1950s. Since it was constructed initially by the Wayne County Road Commission, it was a locally-maintained freeway. The first route number to be assigned to the Lodge was US-12 in 1956 when it was designated along the newly-completed Edsel Ford Frwy (now a portion of I-94). US-12 turned southerly along the Lodge from the Edsel Ford to end in downtown Detroit. In 1960, some Michigan State Highway Dept planning maps showed the US-10 designation being moved over to the I-75/Walter P Chrysler Frwy route (when completed), with Woodward Ave bearing a BUS US-10 designation and the John C Lodge Frwy not bearing any route number north of the Edsel Ford. The next route designation to grace the Lodge Frwy was BS I-696 (Business Spur I-696) in c.1964 when the I-696/Walter P Reuther Frwy was completed from the west, ending at Northwestern Hwy in Southfield. The BS I-696 designation began at the end of I-696 and continued southeasterly via today's John C Lodge Frwy into downtown Detroit. This was the first time a route designation had been applied to all of the Lodge. Then in 1970, the entire freeway was incorporated as part of US-10, which had been removed from parallel Woodward Ave, and the BS I-696 designation was removed. Finally, in the late-1980s (concurrent with a major reconstruction of the Lodge in Detroit), when the US-10 designation was truncated at Bay City, the Lodge was redesignated M-10, which it is today.
  For the first time in over fifty years, exit numbers began appearing on the John C Lodge Frwy in Detroit in April 2005. In the 1970s and early-1980s, MDOT refrained from posting exit numbers on the Lodge interchanges as the freeway was part of the route of US-10, which itself was not constructed as freeway from its "zero-point" at Ludington. When US-10 was truncated back to Bay City in 1986, the M-10 designation was assigned to the Lodge which meant both M-10's and the Lodge's "zero-point" were now the same, at Jefferson Ave & Randolph St in downtown Detroit. However, as part of their "Lodgability" reconstruction of the freeway in the late-1980s, MDOT chose not to erect exit numbers at that time. Assumedly as part of a freeway guide sign replacement program, the department decided to finally include the exit numbers during 2005. This leaves the M-8/Davison Frwy as the only freeway in Detroit without numbered interchanges.
History: 1920s – Prior to the creation of the US Highway system in the mid-1920s, the early version of M-10 begins at the Ohio state line south of Erie, runs northerly along Telegraph Rd to Dearborn, then easterly on Michigan Ave into downtown Detroit. From there, M-10 runs northwesterly through Flint, Saginaw and Bay City roughly along the later route of US-10. From Bay City, M-10 runs roughly along the later route of US-23 along the Lake Huron shore, ending in Mackinaw City.
  1926 – The following US Highways are routed over portions of M-10 in Michigan:
  • US-24 from the Ohio state line to Dearborn at Michigan Ave.
  • US-112 along Michigan Ave from Dearborn into downtown Detroit.
  • US-10 from downtown Detroit, through Pontiac and Flint to downtown Saginaw.
  • US-23 from downtown Saginaw north to Mackinaw City.
  1928 – Just two years after the decommissioning of M-10 in Michigan (due to the coming of the US Highway system), the M-10 designation is reinstated. US-10 is realigned to utilize the new eastern bypass of the city of Flint, which is named "Dort Hwy" soon after; Dort was an early pioneer in the automobile industry in Flint, parterning with William Durant, the founder of General Motors, at one time. The former route of US-10 through Flint is redesignated as M-10, ironically reviving a highway designation which existed along this route two years earlier, prior to the coming of US-10!
  1941-42 – In late 1941 or early 1942, the M-10 designation through the City of Flint is replaced by a brand-new BUS US-10 designation, resulting is the absence of the M-10 designation from Michigan for almost 50 years.
  1986-87 – A third incarnation of M-10 debuts when the US-10 designation is scaled back from downtown Detroit to end in Bay City. The former US-10 from I-75/Fisher Fwy to the I-696 & US-24 interchange in Southfield is redesignated as M-10. Northwestern Hwy from this point northwest to Orchard Lake Rd in West Bloomfield Twp is redesignated from M-4 to M-10. During the summers of 1986 and 1987, the John C Lodge Frwy is completely reconstructed from downtown Detroit to Wyoming Ave in northwest Detroit, and the M-10 shields are erected upon completion of the project.
  1987 – The southernmost portion of the John C Lodge Frwy from I-75/Fisher Frwy into downtown Detroit is officially redesignated from BS I-375 (Business Spur I-375) to M-10. It seems that no BS I-375 markers were actually erected along this route, and the old US-10 route markers were swapped out for new M-10 markers at this time.
  2005 (Apr) – For the first time in over fifty years, exit numbers begin appearing on the John C Lodge Frwy in Detroit. (See note above for details.)
Controlled-Access: Freeway: From Cobo Center in downtown Detroit to the I-696/US-24 interchange in Southfield (specifically at Beck Rd).
  Expressway: None.
NHS: The entire length of M-10 is part of the National Highway System (NHS).
Photographs:  
Weblinks:
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